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What would it take to get you to use the stairs instead of the escalator at your local mall? A team of researchers has found that healthy messages printed on stair risers attract climbers and might even encourage them to descend the stairs later. The riser messages "Take the Stairs" and "7 Minutes of Stair Climbing Daily Protects Your Heart" increased climbing on the staircase by 190 percent and boosted climbing on a nearby staircase with no messages by 52 percent, according to researchers.

Researchers have new insight into why only half of all prescribed preventive asthma medications are actually taken daily as directed and so many kids needlessly suffer symptoms. Turns out, parents' beliefs about their children's medicines (fear of side effects or dependency, even doubt that the medicines are necessary) influence how consistently they administered the drugs.

Teacher performance pay is a frequently discussed and controversial topic among kindergarten through 12th-grade educators. Recent findings by economics professors suggest that states and school districts in the United States begin developing programs that examine the effects of linking teacher pay to student achievement.

Inexpensive pill box organizers are an easy, successful, and cost-effective tool to help patients take their medications as prescribed, according to a new study of low-income urban residents living with HIV infection. Incomplete adherence to HIV therapy is the most common cause of incomplete viral suppression, drug resistance, disease progression, and death among people living with HIV/AIDS.

Paleontologists have long theorized that miniaturization was one of the last stages in the long series of changes required in order for dinosaurs to make the evolutionary "leap" to take flight and so become what we call birds. New evidence from a tiny Mongolian dinosaur, however, may leave some current theories about the evolution of flight up in the air.

The impactor believed to have wiped out the dinosaurs and other life forms on Earth some 65 million years ago has been traced back to a breakup event in the main asteroid belt. A joint U.S.-Czech team from Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) and Charles University in Prague suggests that the parent object of asteroid (298) Baptistina disrupted when it was hit by another large asteroid, creating numerous large fragments that would later create the Chicxulub crater on the Yucatan Peninsula as well as the prominent Tycho crater found on the Moon.