( ! ) Notice: Undefined variable: expandall in /var/www/html/english/templates/dnl/header.inc.php on line 7
Call Stack
#TimeMemoryFunctionLocation
10.0005295384{main}( )../index.php:0
22.76051835272TemplateService->loadTemplate( )../index.php:247
32.76051835888Template->parse( )../templateservice.php:20
42.76121919640include( '/var/www/html/english/templates/dnl/headlines.tpl.php' )../templateservice.php:39
52.76121920320Template->includeTemplate( )../headlines.tpl.php:2
62.76121920384TemplateService->loadTemplate( )../templateservice.php:43
72.76121920864Template->parse( )../templateservice.php:20
82.76141956048include( '/var/www/html/english/templates/dnl/header.inc.php' )../templateservice.php:39
ScienceWeek - Research and Science headlines

( ! ) Notice: Undefined variable: hl_msg in /var/www/html/english/templates/dnl/page-headline.inc.php on line 12
Call Stack
#TimeMemoryFunctionLocation
10.0005295384{main}( )../index.php:0
22.76051835272TemplateService->loadTemplate( )../index.php:247
32.76051835888Template->parse( )../templateservice.php:20
42.76121919640include( '/var/www/html/english/templates/dnl/headlines.tpl.php' )../templateservice.php:39
52.76362112992Template->includeTemplate( )../headlines.tpl.php:24
62.76362112992TemplateService->loadTemplate( )../templateservice.php:43
72.76362113488Template->parse( )../templateservice.php:20
82.76382153216include( '/var/www/html/english/templates/dnl/page-headline.inc.php' )../templateservice.php:39

692,712 articles


( ! ) Notice: Undefined variable: prev_date in /var/www/html/english/templates/dnl/headlines.tpl.php on line 198
Call Stack
#TimeMemoryFunctionLocation
10.0005295384{main}( )../index.php:0
22.76051835272TemplateService->loadTemplate( )../index.php:247
32.76051835888Template->parse( )../templateservice.php:20
42.76121919640include( '/var/www/html/english/templates/dnl/headlines.tpl.php' )../templateservice.php:39

THURSDAY 22. AUGUST, 2019


French mayor due in court after banning pesticide use near homesA mayor in northwest France is to appear in court on Thursday after banning the use of pesticides near homes in his village in a case that is seen as emblematic of rising opposition to chemical pollution in rural areas. The mayor of the village of Langouet, Daniel Cueff, imposed a ban in mid-May on the use of any pesticides on land within 150 metres (yards) of homes or workplaces, citing his authority to block anything polluting the land within his community. Cueff, who will defend a state challenge to his ban in court, has spent the past 20 years working on environmental issues in his community of around 600, banning chemical weedkiller and opening an organic school canteen in 2004.


Scientific papers go through a peer-review process before they are accepted for publication in a journal. They are sent to two or more independent researchers for comment. Those researchers are asked to assess the robustness of the methods used and the conclusions drawn, as well as the novelty of the study. The reviewers' comments play an important role in determining which papers get accepted and published.

Horseshoe bats are bizarre-looking animals with giant ears and elaborate flaps of skin on their noses that they use like satellite dishes. There are about a hundred different species of horseshoe bats—and that number is only going to grow. By studying the DNA of horseshoe bat specimens in museum collections, scientists have discovered that there are probably a dozen new species of horseshoe bat that haven't been officially described yet.

GSK long-acting HIV injection succeeds in studyThe long-acting needle-based combination of its drug cabotegravir and Janssen's treatment rilpivirine met its main goal in the study, which was testing the regimen in adults with HIV-1 whose virus was suppressed. The patients were also not resistant to either of the two drugs, said ViiV Healthcare, London-listed GSK's HIV unit. "This is further progress in our efforts to reduce the number of medicines a person living with HIV must take while also reducing the frequency of treatments," said Kimberly Smith, Head of Research & Development at ViiV.


Age UK says unintended interactions between different medicines can be dangerous

About 7 million elderly people in the UK are on at least seven different medications and at risk of potentially life-threatening harm from interactions between the drugs or side-effects from pills that are no longer right for them.

Older people are being let down by a healthcare system that is allowing medicines to do more harm than good, according to a report from Age UK. One in five prescriptions for elderly people living at home are inappropriate, it said. Care home residents take an average of at least eight medicines, with a one in 10 risk of a mistake when the drugs are prescribed or given to them.

Continue reading...

A Democratic debate on the climate crisis? Party to vote on urgent ideaCalls for an officially sanctioned debate have been growing louder, but party leaders are resistantCould the future hold a Democratic debate focused entirely on the climate crisis? Photograph: CNN/Zuma Wire/Rex/ShutterstockAs delegates from the Democratic National Committee (DNC) meet this week in San Francisco to hear from 2020 candidates, hold fundraising events and tend to party business, there’s an urgent issue on the agenda: the climate crisis.More specifically, should one of the 12 Democratic debates be devoted entirely to the issue?Calls for a DNC-sanctioned climate debate have been building for months. Now a party committee is expected to vote Thursday morning on competing resolutions to determine whether such an event should go ahead. While most advocates believe the answer will be no, they say this is the latest, but not the last, time the party will debate a climate debate – the issue is simply too pressing to let go.In poll after poll, climate has been one of the most important issues to likely Democratic voters in the 2020 presidential election. But little time has been devoted to the topic in debates to date: a scant 15 minutes in the first set of debates, and just over 20 in the most recent two.While pressure has mounted inside and outside the party to hold a climate-focused debate, DNC leadership has pushed back at every turn. The struggle has highlighted divisions between party leadership and a progressive base that is increasingly vocal about the urgent need to address the climate emergency.“Climate is such an intersectional issue. It allows us to talk about jobs, economics, racial disparities, healthcare, national security,” said Tina Podlodowski, the chair of the Washington State Democrats and the author of the resolution calling for a climate debate. “And then of course there’s that little issue of the very survival of our species.”Since April, calls for Democrats to hold a climate debate have trickled up from environmental advocates to state party leadership. The resolution has more than 70 co-sponsors from across the country. Last week, Progressive Democrats of America circulated an open letter to the DNC chair, Tom Perez, calling for a climate debate, signed by environmental group leaders and activists alongside party members.But DNC leadership has held fast to its position against “single issue” debates. Earlier this month, Perez added his own resolution to the San Francisco convention schedule that, while affirming Democrats’ commitment to climate action, stood by the current debate schedule.In a Medium post, Perez wrote that amending party rules and allowing for a climate debate “would be putting our thumb on the scale”, as the DNC has also received requests for topical debates ranging from gun control to seniors issues.Activists, however, argue that climate change is not a “single issue”. “The climate crisis impacts every aspect of our lives,” said Sofie Karasek, the deputy communications director at the youth-led Sunrise Movement, which has been pressuring Democrats to spend more time on the problem. “It just continues to show that the leadership of the party is out of touch with what the base wants.”The first four debates were dominated by healthcare, immigration and the economy. What discussion there was on the climate crisis highlighted stark differences between the candidates. John Hickenlooper, who has since dropped out of the race, and John Delaney have both rejected the Green New Deal, in contrast with Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders, while Jay Inslee, who dropped out of the race on Wednesday, built his entire candidacy around climate action.A formal debate “would make for good television, but perhaps not good intra-Democrat party politics”, said Karasek.The DNC has argued that two televised “climate forums” scheduled to take place in September are a sufficient substitute for a debate. CNN will host a climate forum on 4 September, featuring 10 of the frontrunners. MSNBC, Georgetown University and Our Daily Planet will host another forum from 19-20 September, open to all declared candidates.However, say advocates, a forum and a debate are not comparable political events, either in form or reach. The forum format will have individual speakers on stage, unchallenged by other candidates. And while the debates have commanded between 10 and 18 million viewers, town halls and forums tend to attract far lower ratings.And any independently organized climate debate event is unlikely, as DNC rules could disqualify candidates from future official events if they were to engage in one.Despite low expectations for Thursday’s vote, supporters of a debate say they won’t be deterred. There are plans to bring the resolution to the convention floor for a vote Saturday. And, if that doesn’t work, they plan to continue to raise the issue throughout the long primary campaign, with the hopes that candidates will take up the issue and demand the debate themselves.“The voters aren’t going to let go of this, and the state parties aren’t going to let go of this,” said Podlodowski. “In an election, if something’s not working, you change.”


How Brazil and Vietnam are tightening their grip on the world's coffeeA towering machine rumbles through the fields of Julio Rinco's farm in the Brazilian state of Sao Paulo, engulfing whole coffee trees and shaking free beans that are collected by conveyor belts in its depths. This automatic harvester is one of several innovations that have cut Rinco's production costs to a level that few who use traditional, labour-intensive methods can match. With increasing use of mechanization and other new technologies, the world's top two coffee producers, Brazil and Vietnam, are achieving productivity growth that outstrips rivals in places such as Colombia, Central America and Africa.


Jay Inslee exits crowded 2020 US Democratic fieldWashington Governor Jay Inslee dropped out of the race for the Democratic party's 2020 presidential nomination on Wednesday, thinning the crowded field to 22. "It's become clear that I'm not gonna be carrying the ball, I'm not gonna be the president, so I'm withdrawing tonight from the race," Inslee told MSNBC's Rachel Maddow. Inslee -- who was polling less than one percent, according to an aggregate of recent surveys -- built his campaign around the issue of tackling climate change, and he returned to the same theme even as he announced his exit from the race.


Washington Gov. Jay Inslee says he's ending presidential bidWashington Gov. Jay Inslee, who made fighting climate change the central theme of his presidential campaign, announced Wednesday night that he is ending his bid for the 2020 Democratic nomination. Inslee said that he was confident that Democrats would select a nominee who would champion climate change issues but that it had become clear that he wouldn't be the person selected. Inslee said he was not endorsing anyone but would support whoever is the nominee.


Jay Inslee Drops Out of Democratic Presidential Contest(Bloomberg) -- Washington Governor Jay Inslee, who built his campaign around fighting climate change, is dropping out of the race for the Democratic presidential nomination.Inslee, who has lagged in polling and fundraising, told MSNBC’s Rachel Maddow on Wednesday night that he had decided to withdraw because he had determined he couldn’t win the nomination. He didn’t say whether he would seek a third term as governor.“It’s become clear that I’m not going to be carrying the ball. I’m not going to be the president. So I’m withdrawing tonight from the race,” Inslee said on Maddow’s program.Inslee, 68, had positioned himself as the climate change candidate and called for a $9 trillion investment to address the crisis and reach 100% clean energy by 2035. His plan mandated that within the next decade, all new commercial and residential buildings be carbon-free, all electricity carbon neutral and all new cars and light trucks be emissions-free.Even though climate change is a top issue for many voters, Inslee’s campaign never caught on. He pushed for a debate solely devoted to climate change, but the request was rejected by the Democratic National Committee.He participated in the two first debates of Democratic contenders, though he didn’t meet a polling threshold for the third, in Houston next month, or for a town hall on climate change organized by CNN, also scheduled for September.He never consistently polled above 1% percent and raised $3.1 million in the second quarter after raising $2.3 million in the first.Inslee becomes the third Democratic presidential candidate to leave the 2020 race, following former Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper and Representative Eric Swalwell of California.Gun control was also a key issue for Inslee who lost his seat in the House of Representatives in 1994 after he voted in favor of banning the sale of assault weapons.\--With assistance from Sahil Kapur.To contact the reporter on this story: Emma Kinery in Washington at ekinery@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Kasia Klimasinska at kklimasinska@bloomberg.net, Max Berley, John HarneyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


Washington Gov. Jay Inslee announces he's dropping out of the 2020 raceWashington Gov. Jay Inslee is dropping out of the 2020 presidential race. Inslee was the first governor to declare a run for the White House in March. In a Twitter thread, Inslee shared a clip of his announcement and wrote, "I know you agree that our mission to defeat climate change must continue to be central to our national discussion -- and must be the top priority for our next president.


Washington Governor Inslee withdraws bid for U.S. Democratic presidential nominationWashington state Governor Jay Inslee, who made the fight against climate change the focus of his White House campaign, said on Wednesday he was withdrawing from the race for the 2020 U.S. Democratic presidential nomination. The 68-year-old Inslee, speaking on MSNBC, said it had become clear he would not be the party's standard-bearer and that he was pulling out of the race. Inslee announced his bid for the Democratic nomination on March 1.


Washington Governor Inslee withdraws bid for U.S. Democratic presidential nominationWashington state Governor Jay Inslee, who made the fight against climate change the focus of his White House campaign, said on Wednesday he was withdrawing from the race for the 2020 U.S. Democratic presidential nomination. The 68-year-old Inslee, speaking on MSNBC, said it had become clear he would not be the party's standard-bearer and that he was pulling out of the race. Inslee announced his bid for the Democratic nomination on March 1.